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Baby Food Guidelines

When can your baby start eating solid foods? What about meat? Pediatricians answer all your baby food Qs. This guide gives you all the information you need to know on what to feed your little one(s)!

We can all agree that gauging when to start a baby’s first solid foods can be stressful, but Fisher reminds new parents to focus on the signs of readiness as a top priority instead of focusing solely on age. In her practice, she’s seen some babies who are ready for their first taste at 4 months, while others do better with solids at 6 months of age.

You can consider it a win once your baby has successfully kept down 2 to 3 tablespoons of food. Transitioning a baby from liquids to solids can take some time, Curtiss advises. “The first few times a baby is offered solids, she may spit it out, get it all over and not really know what to do with it. I generally recommend that parents take it slow and just have fun with it.”

 

 

http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/1074684/baby-food-guide

If your child meets the criteria listed by Curtiss and Fisher above and has the approval of their pediatrician, you can move along to the next stage of feeding. “Usually, the first food to be introduced is a single grain cereal, such as rice, mixed with breast milk until it is the consistency of pudding and fed on the spoon,” Curtiss explains. But you can also start with a vegetable such as sweet potato or avocado. Fruits are also a popular choice for little babes developing their taste buds for the first time — and they’re easy to mash.

Remember: The most important thing before starting solids is getting your pediatrician’s approval. Both articles breakdown age groups and recommended foods.

http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/1074684/baby-food-guide/page:2

 

Simple ways to get started with a yoga routine & why it’s important

As part of a healthy lifestyle, yoga may lower cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar, according to Harvard Health Publications.

Improved Brain Function.
Just 20 minutes of Hatha yoga — an ancient form of the practice that emphasizes physical postures rather than flow or sequences — can improve cognitive function, boosting focus and working memory. In a University of Illinois study, participants performed significantly better on tests of brain functioning after yoga, as compared to their performance after 20 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise.

Lower Stress Levels.
Yoga’s stress-busting powers may come from its ability to lessen the activity of proteins that are known to play a role in inflammation, according to a study published last year from University of California, Los Angeles researchers.

Increased Flexibility.
A recent Colorado State University study found that Bikram yoga — a form of yoga in which a series of 26 postures are performed for 90 minutes in a heated room — is linked with increased shoulder, lower back and hamstring flexibility, as well as greater deadlift strength and decreased body fat, compared with a control group.

 

 

After A Few Months.

Lower Blood Pressure.
People with mild to moderate hypertension might benefit from a yoga practice, as a study from University of Pennsylvania researchers found that it could help to lower their blood pressure levels. Researchers found that people who practiced yoga had greater drops in blood pressure compared with those who participated in a walking/nutrition/weight counseling program.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/28/body-on-yoga_n_4109595.html

Zinc and Health

Zinc has been a well known requirement for nearly all living beings for hundreds of years. Especially vital for children, zinc is a requirement for normal growth and development.

Zinc is used for treatment and prevention of zinc deficiency and its consequences, including stunted growth and acute diarrhea in children, and slow wound healing. It is also used for boosting the immune system, treating the common cold and recurrent ear infections, and preventing lower respiratory infections.

Zinc Deficiency

Deficiencies in zinc affect the skin and the intestines, as well as the majority of the skeletal, reproductive, and immune systems. For years, the most noted clinical feature of zinc deficiency is severe growth retardation. Adults who suffered zinc deficiencies were noted to have hypogonadism, macular degeneration, poor wound healing, and intellectual disability.

The most common signs and symptoms associated with zinc deficiency include:
  • Changes in appetite, including food cravings for salty or sweet foods.
  • Changes in ability to taste and smell.
  • Weight gain or loss.
  • Hair loss.
  • Digestive problems, including diarrhea.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • Infertility.

Zinc in Diet

The human body can only get approximately 20%-40% of zinc from the food that we eat. If you have a zinc deficiency, then animal foods are better sources of zinc than plant foods. Foods high in zinc include oysters, beef, lamb, toasted wheat germ, spinach, pumpkin seeds, squash seeds, nuts, dark chocolate, pork, chicken, beans, and mushrooms.

How Much Do We Need to Experience These Zinc Benefits?

According to the USDA, the dietary reference intakes for zinc below are based on age and gender:

Infants:

  • 0–6 months: 2 milligrams/day
  • 7–12 months: 3 milligrams/day

Children:

  • 1–3 years: 3 milligrams/day
  • 4–8 years: 5 milligrams/day
  • 9 –13 years: 8 milligrams/day

Adolescents and adults:

  • Males age 14 and over: 11 milligrams/day
  • Females age 14 to 18 years: 9 milligrams/day
  • Females age 19 and over: 8 milligrams/day

 

Zinc is usually available in various forms, including lozenges, syrups, gels and capsules. Zinc is also found in most multivitamin and mineral supplements. These supplements can contain zinc in the form of zinc gluconate, zinc sulfate or zinc acetate. As of now, all are believed to work in very similar ways so one type is not thought to be superior over the others.

Factors that affect zinc absorption are pregnancy, skin disorders, and other diseases that affect the immune system, kidneys, liver, and heart. People who suffer from metabolic disorders and cancer should also ask their doctor for the right zinc dosage, as well as the possibility of zinc supplementation to ensure adequate zinc intake.

References:

Amazing Facts About Zinc

https://draxe.com/zinc-benefits/

[1] Human Rhinoviruses. American Society for Microbiology. http://cmr.asm.org/content/26/1/135.full.pdf+html

[2] Oral Zinc and Common Childhood Infections – An update. Journal of
Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0946672X14000728

[3] Introducing zinc in a diarrhoeal control programme. World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent/documents/9789241596473/en/

[4] Encyclopedia of Human Nutrition. Elsevier. http://jn.nutrition.org/content/130/5/1344S.full.pdf

[5] Impact of the discovery of human zinc deficiency on health. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0946672X14001710

[6] Zinc. University of Maryland Medical Center. http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/zinc

[7] Zinc. Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/zinc/dosing/hrb-20060638

Amazing Facts About Zinc graphic © herbs-info.com/naturalhealthzone.org.
Food images – Wikipedia lic. under CC (see foot of article for full license info)

Are you experiencing sensitivity from the foods you eat?

 

We are excited to announce that we are now offering the FIT 22 Test through Lifestyle Health Mentor.

The list of foods and additives selected for the 22 panel are foods that most frequently yield reactions on the FIT Test. The foods tested are: gluten, whole wheat, egg white, egg yolk, cow’s milk, casein, candida, brewer’s yeast, banana, beef, broccoli, coffee, corn, chicken, peanut, tomato, white potato, almonds, pineapple, salmon, shrimp, and turmeric.

http://Schedule your complimentary consultation at: https://gethealthie.com/appointments/embed_appt?dietitian_id=44972&require_offering=true&offering_id=13748

 

Live Your Best Newsletter

Powerful plant protein (plus cooking tips!)

 

Happy Monday~

 

“I was determined to know beans.”— Henry David Thoreau, The Bean-Field

 

How about you? How well do you know beans?

Creamy cannellinis, meaty garbanzos, sweet adzuki, tender pintos, and so many more—beans are one of the most powerful, nutrient-dense plant foods around.

Consider this: Beans are packed with tons of fiber, as well as plenty of iron and protein. They are rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients. They are low in calories.

Plus, studies have found them to lower risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

What To Do With Beans

Many people avoid beans because they just don’t know what to do with them. Are you one of them? Keep reading:

• Toss beans and diced veggies (such as celery, shallots, red peppers) with vinaigrette for a quick bean salad.
• Blend cooked beans with tomatoes, onions, and your favorite seasonings to create a yummy bean soup.
• Top a green salad with 1/3 cup of your favorite bean.
• Puree beans with a bit of olive oil, a garlic clove, salt, and your favorite seasonings. Voila! A fast dip or sandwich spread.
• Include 1/3 cup of beans with your other favorite toppings next time you make stuffed baked potatoes or sweet potatoes.
• Add 1/4 cup pureed beans to your favorite pancake, waffle, muffin, or cake recipe. You’ll be surprised at how moist and springy baked goods are when baked with beans.

If you’re new to cooking with beans, try these tips for delicious and well-cooked beans.

• Be sure to wash and clean the beans first.
• Soak dried beans for 8-12 hours before cooking (hint: cut a bean in half; if the center is still opaque, keep soaking).
• After soaking, rinse, fill pot with fresh water, bring to a boil, then skim off the foam.
• To aid digestion, add kombu, bay leaf, cumin, anise, or fennel to the water
• Cover and simmer for the suggested time.
• Remember: Only add salt at the end of cooking (about 10 minutes before the beans are done) or it will interfere with the cooking process.
• Quick tips: For speedier prep, boil dried beans for 5 minutes, then soak for 2-4 hours. Or use canned beans instead (some people find them even easier to digest!). Be sure to avoid canned beans with added salt or preservatives and rinse thoroughly once removed from the can.

GET EVEN HEALTHIER!

Check out my newest Gut Health Program:

https://gethealthie.com/appointments/embed_appt?dietitian_id=44972&require_offering=true&offering_id=13702

Would you like help learning how to choose and cook healthy foods like beans? Curious about how health coaching can help you make your own healthy changes? Let’s talk! Schedule an initial complimentary consultation with me today——or pass this offer on to someone you care about!

https://gethealthie.com/appointments/embed_appt?dietitian_id=44972&require_offering=true&offering_id=13748

ABOUT ME
I received my training from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, where I learned about more than one hundred dietary theories and studied a variety of practical lifestyle coaching methods. Drawing on this knowledge, I will help you create a completely personalized “roadmap to health” that suits your unique body, lifestyle, preferences, and goals.

 

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