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Clean Living, Healthy Breathing: Maintaining Safe Indoor Air Quality for Your Kids

Clean Living, Healthy Breathing: Maintaining Safe Indoor Air Quality for Your Kids

 

Clean Living, Healthy Breathing: Maintaining Safe Indoor Air Quality for Your Kids

 

When it comes to clean breathing air for our children, most parents are more likely to worry about what kids are breathing outdoors. But the truth is that indoor air pollution is, on average, from two to five times higher than outside, and it can cause an array of dangerous health problems. It may take the EPA decades to improve our breathing air outside, but you can keep your kids breathing safely inside your home with a few simple improvements.

Natural ventilation

One surefire way to improve the quality of your children’s breathing air is to ventilate your home naturally. Switch off the air conditioning and throw open the doors and windows for 15 or 20 minutes every day. Creating a healthy natural flow will clear your home of pollutants and freshen the smell and feel of your interior. It’s a good way to enhance ventilation naturally and let lingering odors from that garlic prawn pasta dish float away once and for all.

Air quality threats and causes

There are several factors that play a role in an unhealthy home. Humidity—too much or too little—contributes significantly to poor indoor air quality by creating a breeding haven for dust mites, mold spores, and pet dander. Mold is particularly dangerous to your child’s breathing and can cause a litany of upper-respiratory problems. It also poses a danger to the wood and drywall inside your home, which will begin to warp and rot over time if the humidity inside is too high. If humidity and moisture are major problems in your home, consider purchasing a dehumidifier, which helps moderate the humidity levels. Simply set your unit to 50 percent and make sure to empty the receptacle bucket and keep it clean, and you should be in good shape. Poorly ventilated homes create a “perfect storm” for mold growth and allow certain dangerous gases to build up. Radon gas is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers according to the EPA and the second-leading cause of lung cancer overall.

Purifiers

Indoor air purifiers, properly maintained with a HEPA filter, are effective at reducing pollutants in the home for those who suffer from allergies and asthma. Some use ultraviolet light to kill off pollutants like viruses and bacteria, while other purifiers combine UV light with a catalyst, which renders gaseous particles harmless. If allergens and pollutants are a major problem in your house, consider having a whole-house filter fitted for your HVAC system, which will remove harmful particles from your duct system.

Safe cleaning

Commercial cleaning products can contribute significantly to poor indoor air quality, so try substituting eco-friendly substances like baking soda, lemon, and vinegar as cleaning fluids. Use microfiber cloths for cleaning instead of dusting sprays that can exacerbate breathing problems. Incorporate indoor plants like ferns and lilies, which can filter out allergens and improve your air quality safely and naturally. If it’s necessary to use strong commercial products, be sure to open the windows and create a steady flow of air for effective ventilation. Make sure to keep all carpeting well-vacuumed to help control allergens.

No smoking! For children with respiratory issues, secondary tobacco smoke, which contains about 7,000 chemicals according to the Centers for Disease Control, will exacerbate their condition and make it difficult to breathe freely. Kids with pulmonary illness may cough and show other symptoms that resemble those of the common cold, as well as nasal flaring, loss of appetite, and decreased urine output. Post a sign in your home which makes it clear there’s no smoking inside your home ever, so your Uncle Bob the cigar smoker has no excuse for lighting up and filling your home with heavy, acrid smoke the next time he stops by.

One very good way to keep your kids breathing healthy is to make sure they spend plenty of time outside this summer. Get the whole family outside together to do some backyard camping, go bike riding, or play Frisbee golf.

Poor indoor air quality is dangerous to young children, whose lungs are still developing, and may contribute to sudden infant death syndrome. Kids need clean, well-ventilated air to breathe if they are to grow up healthy and happy.

 

About the author:

Julia Merrill has many years of experience in the medical field and runs the site BefriendYourDoc.org.

Julia’s mission is to close the gap between medical providers and their patients, and aims to provide tips on finding the right medical care, health insurance, etc.

Sources:

Photo Credit:

New findings may explain the advantages of polyunsaturated fat

Written by Coach Connie,

Lifestyle Health Mentor

 

When we think of the word “fat”- We remember back to our parents and grandparents using lard for everything they made or putting a huge slab of butter on bread. Back then, we didn’t think anything of it when we were eating fat, whether it was good or bad for us. We just thought it was part of our diet.

Today, no matter where you look – you see news reports saying eat this fat but don’t eat this fat. We’re always trying to find the lowest fat diet. It almost seems as if we all need to be scientists just to figure out what should we eat. So let’s take a look at what polyunsaturated fat is, why it’s good for us and what should we consume to achieve the full benefits.

So, what is polyunsaturated fat and how does it affect our health? It is found in animal and plant foods, which is known as one of the healthier fats, together with monounsaturated fat. The biggest thing to remember is that we want to add in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat, which will be replacing saturated fats, commonly found in red meat, butter, cheese, and ice cream; and trans fat, which are unhealthy fats found in partially hydrogenated oil, that could increase health problems such as risk for heart disease. When you reduce the red meat and butter intake, substitute them with fish, beans, nuts, and healthy oils rather than refined carbohydrates. That’s why adding polyunsaturated fats into your diet can help lower your bad cholesterol (LDL), which causes your arteries to become blocked or clogged. It can contribute vitamin E to your diet, which is an antioxidant. By adding more of this healthier fat into our diets, it can boost your overall body, mind and soul, along with your waistline. Now isn’t that a bonus.

This type of fat includes omega-3 and omega-6 fats (EFA’s), which are essential fatty acids that helps our brain function and cell growth. We need to supplement these EFA’s through our food, since our body does not produce this on its own. They protect our heart because they contain EPA and DHA. They lower the risk of fatal heart attacks and sudden cardiac death caused by electrical problems that occur in the heart. By consuming fish, it may reduce the risk of stroke too and keep in mind, it contains vitamin D, healthy proteins, selenium, and other nutrients. It is recommended that you consume at least two 3-4oz servings of fish and seafood, including one serving of oily or dark meat fish per week. As for vegetable oils, it is recommended that you consume 5-6 teaspoons per day, which includes oil found in foods.

Lately, all you hear about is coconut oil or palm oils. Are they really better for you? Well, according to the AHA, there is no real known evidence as of now so, they recommend to stick to vegetable oils, because of the overwhelming evidence they are good for the heart.

So, how does the omega-3 and omega-6 fats work to our benefit?

  1. Lower triglycerides and lowers the risk of having an irregular heartbeat, known as arrhythmia.
  2. Cuts down the buildup of plaque in our arteries and decreasing our blood pressure
  3. It can regulate our blood sugar and lower our diabetes risk
  4. Lower inflammation and contains beneficial phytochemicals from the oil seeds

There are several foods that are recommended as part of the polyunsaturated fat category:

  1. Fish, including salmon, herring, trout, albacore tuna, anchovy, sardines, bluefish, mussels, halibut, bass, oysters and mackerel
  2. Vegetable, Safflower, Corn, Flax, Olive, Canola and Soybean oil
  3. Sunflower, poppy, chia and flax seeds
  4. Eggs and avocado
  5. Walnuts, soybeans, almonds, pine and brazil nuts
  6. Fresh, raw pork sausage, pork, roasted turkey, roasted chicken wings and duck
  7. Quinoa, toasted wheat germ, raw oat bran, dry chickpeas, millet, tahini and firm tofu

So, what if you don’t care for fish or have a fish allergy? According to the American Heart Association, you may want to supplement with over the counter fish oil capsules. Keep in mind, they are not regulated by the FDA. Most capsules carry about 200-400 mg of EPA plus DHA, which should be sufficient for most people. As always, consult with your doctor on a higher dose requirement. Some capsules leave an aftertaste or cause burping, so it’s best to choose the burp free option when choosing the right fish oil capsule.

Please note: As I always say, all in moderation, because eating too much of this type of fat can lead to weight gain, which contains 9 calories per gram. Carbohydrates and proteins carry half of that amount of calories, so just be aware of your consumption amount.

So, how does this compare to my daily healthy plate regimen? It is recommended to allow no more than 25%-30% of fat in your daily calories, of which should be from the polyunsaturated and monounsaturated groups. Keep in mind, limit the other fats, such as saturated fat to less than 6% of your daily calories.

Should we really have to read every label to see what type fat is in the product? Yes, because as stated, there are good and bad fats, so by knowing what to look for when purchasing the product will only benefit your health in the long run. Of course, keep in mind, that when food manufacturers lower fat, they usually substitute it with carbohydrates from sugar, refined grains, or other starches. These are digested faster in our bodies, which affects our insulin and blood sugar levels. This can result in weight gain and diseases.

As always, consult your health professional on any health concerns or questions.

I hope this article finds you in good health.

Sources:

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000747.htm

https://healthyforgood.heart.org/Eat-smart/Articles/Polyunsaturated-Fats

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/healthy-eating/choosing-healthy-fats.htm

http://www.anneshealthykitchen.com/top-30-foods-high-in-polyunsaturated-fat/

https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/healthy-eating/food-and-nutrition/fats-and-cholesterol/monounsaturated-and-polyunsaturated-omega-3-and-omega-6-fats

What is the “Zone” Diet and is there a comparison to the “Mediterranean” Diet?

Written by Coach Connie,

Lifestyle Health Mentor

 

Did you know there are over 100 dietary theories out there and that’s just the ones that have been referenced or documented? When we look back on our ancestor’s daily meal habits, we most likely seen meat, potatoes, vegetables and occasionally the dessert daunting us to have a piece. There are so many ways to get our nutrients and diets are the focus of society’s outtake on living healthy.

So what is the right “diet”?  There’s a reason there are so many “diets” in reach, but what does each do and how do we know what works and doesn’t. As someone who has been in the health industry for years, I’ve been there. I felt like I was my own test subject to figuring my body out. That’s why no diet works for everyone, we all are different, but knowing what we can have and what our body needs is half the battle.

I started with the “Zone Diet” and then switched to the “Mediterranean Diet” due to changes in my exercise routine and metabolic changes. Once I achieved my goal weight, I wanted to ensure that I would recover more rapidly from exercise by controlling my levels of inflammation, and doing this in a way that allows me to perform at my highest possible level.

Dr. Barry Sears wrote the book on the “Zone Diet” and then almost 20 years later, wrote the book titled, “The Mediterranean Zone”.  It has very similar attributes, but unlike the Mediterranean diet, the Zone Diet shifts on view on the healthy eating plate. The Zone diet contains 40% of the calories as carbohydrates, 30% of the calories as protein, and 30% of the calories as fat. This improved protein-to-carbohydrate balance means decreased insulin levels and decreased cellular inflammation. A Mediterranean diet shifts the carbohydrates to 50%, protein goes down to 20% and the fat remains at 30%. That’s why it’s been highly recommended for weight loss and cardiovascular health.  Technically, they both have benefits that tie together. Again, depending on our inflammation and metabolic factors and how it affects our insulin responses.

To ensure the best results, time out your meals to help stabilize blood sugar levels and add in physical activity at least three days per week.

An example of a daily meal plan:

  • 7am: breakfast (should be eaten within 1 hour of waking)
  • 12pm: lunch (eaten no more than 5 hours later)
  • 5pm: a mid-afternoon snack
  • 7pm: dinner (2-3 hours after snack)
  • 11pm: a late night snack right before bed to balance blood sugar levels in the brain while sleeping

The Zone Diet states that a 1/3 of the plate (about 3oz for women and 4oz for men) should be made up of protein, and the remaining 2/3 should be fruits and vegetables – with a dash of monounsaturated oil to finish off the meal.

So let’s clarify, what are the some examples of the right foods and ones to avoid and the pros & cons to the Zone Diet:

Foods to include:

  • Skinless chicken
  • Fish
  • Egg whites
  • Tofu
  • Legumes
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Olive oil
  • Almonds
  • Avocado
  • Turkey
  • Low-fat dairy
  • Soy meat substitutes

Foods to avoid:

  • Trans-fats
  • High sugar fruits and veggies like corn and bananas
  • Breads
  • Pasta
  • Rice
  • Fruit juices
  • Tortillas
  • Bagels

Pros:

  • Discourages the consumption of trans-fats
  • Promotes consistent eating habits
  • Recommends adequate intake of fruits and vegetables

Cons:

  • Zone products are processed
  • Excludes certain plant based foods

The Mediterranean diet consists of natural, whole foods such as whole grains, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, nuts, dairy, and pure oils, and excludes processed and refined foods. The diet includes an abundance of extra virgin olive oil and seasonal fruits and vegetables as well as whole, unprocessed grains. It’s recommended that wine consumption remain at 1-2 small glasses daily, and coffee is consumed moderately for pleasure and mental stimulation.

Now let’s take a look at some of the examples of the right foods and ones to avoid and the pros & cons to the Mediterranean Diet:

Foods to include:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Whole grain
  • Fish
  • Meats
  • Dairy
  • Nuts
  • Olive oil

Foods to avoid:

  • Processed foods
  • Refined foods

Pros:

  • Moderate, flexible approach
  • Considers primary food
  • May become a sustainable lifestyle approach

Cons:

  • Some may require firmer guidelines to feel their best
  • Some may not react well to wine and coffee
  • Some may not have the willpower to moderate rich foods

 

To put things in perspective, the zone diet is the evolution of the Mediterranean diet. There is no “one–size fits all” diets, but reviewing both methods shows very comparable methods, but unique when comparing our overall dietary guidelines.

Find what works best for your body type and always consult your health professional. I hope this article finds you in good health.

 

Sources:

Get started with the Mediterranean Diet www.mediterraneandietforall.com

Mediterranean Diet www.health.usnews.com

Mediterranean Diet www.mediterraneandiet.com

The Zone Diet. webmd.com. 6 February 2009

What is the Mediterranean Diet and The Zone Diet? www.Zonediet.com? 21 March 2011

2017 Integrative Nutrition, Inc. Learning Center under Dietary Theories

3 Tips for All Ages on Getting Better Sleep

Written & Submitted by: Julia Merrill

3 Tips for All Ages on Getting Better Sleep

 

According to Neil Howe at Forbes.com, we are a sleep-deprived nation, spending too much time at night gazing at computer or tablet or smartphone screens, over-caffeinating ourselves and our kids, staying up too late to catch who’s on our favorite TV shows, then getting jolted awake five hours later to start the next day. Not only does lack of sleep cause us to feel grumpy and tired much of the time, it affects us in so many other ways, including increased blood pressure and a weakened immune system. In addition, it also affects our release of insulin as well as our balance and coordination.

 

Adults aren’t the only ones affected by sleep deprivation. It affects our children too. They can be harder to wake up in the mornings (more so than usual), become more accident prone, and can have difficulty focusing and applying themselves at school. Clearly, lack of sleep affects everybody, not only the ones who are sleep-deprived but also employers (from a lack of worker productivity or accidents on the job) and educators (students falling asleep in class or getting behind in their schoolwork), just to name a few. With so many sleep-deprived people, it’s no wonder there seem to be coffee shops on every street corner.

 

Clearly, lack of sleep is a problem for everyone. Here are some ways you can make sure everyone in your family gets plenty of quality sleep, which can give children a boost of energy to do well in school and adults plenty of energy to make it through the workday.

 

  1. Improve Your Mattress and Pillows

According to The Huffington Post, new beds can result in a significant decrease in stress levels. If you’re still sleeping on the same mattress you had when you moved into your first apartment, it’s time to change. Invest in a quality mattress and box spring set. You can save money in the long run by purchasing a platform bed so that you only need to purchase a mattress. When you test drive a mattress at the store, check its firmness and notice how it supports pressure points on your hips and your back. Pillows are a matter of personal choice and comfort, but if yours is as flat as a table, it’s time to replace it. The Sleep Doctor states that the best type of pillow supports your head, neck, and shoulders, and matches the feel of your mattress.

 

  1. Darken the Bedrooms

 

Having lots of windows to let in the light is a great thing for a house – during the day. At night, you don’t want glow from streetlights or headlights of cars, or from your neighbors’ houses coming into your bedrooms. To prevent that, invest in a set of blackout curtains or heavier blinds. Be careful, though. Blackout curtains can prevent natural sunlight from coming in as well, and that can upset your body’s natural circadian rhythm. So be sure to separate them enough to let in daylight

 

  1. Minimize the Distractions (and the Caffeine)

Make a household rule that all phones, tablets, laptops and TVs  must be turned off two hours before bed. If the adults are taking online classes or have important work deadlines, consider extending that by an hour. All of these devices emit what’s called “blue light,” which our brain interprets as daylight. If you need to, keep all household cell phones in one location during “device curfew.” Keep one available for emergency only. If you use your phone as your alarm clock, keep it away from your nightstand but loud enough so you can hear the alarm. Also, try to avoid caffeinated beverages approximately six hours before you go to bed. That might put a crimp in your normal caffeine intake, but it also might help you sleep better.

 

If we minimize distractions, cut back on our caffeine intake, and improve our bedding and bedrooms, we can become more restful, healthy, and energetic people.

 

Photo Credit: Unsplash.com

Julia Merrill Bio:

Julia Merrill has many years of experience in the medical field and runs the site BefriendYourDoc.org.
Julia’s mission is to close the gap between medical providers and their patients, and aims to provide tips on finding the right medical care, health insurance, etc.

 

An endometriosis and infertility success with dry fasting

Background:

In 2012, at the age of 61 and after a career in self-employment in many different industries, I decided to go back to university and study for a post-graduate wellness degree. My interest in complementary medicine began in the early 1990’s – via a relationship. In 2011, I had been stimulated by an article about a man completing his fourth degree, a Masters in Clinical Science – at the age of 97! My rationale about returning to study was that I still had more than 35 years to go before reaching my late 90’s; provided I could stay alive and healthy that long.

My last study was in the mid-1980’s for an MBA. My first degree was in accounting and finance in the 1970’s. I was a bit rusty when I commenced the wellness degree, and the technologies had changed, enabling me to study online. But I quickly adapted and enjoyed the research component.

Methylenetetrahydofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation

Early in 2012, I also had a nutrigenomics DNA test, and discovered that I have a MTHFR mutation which predisposes me to high homocysteine. This in-turn predisposes me to cardiovascular disease, depression, Alzheimer’s, cancer and more (Holford & Braly, 2012). For females, a MTHFR mutation can have serious effects on fertility.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcjSs6Abr1Y

The B vitamins, especially activated forms of folate and B12 and trimethylglicine (TMG), are the natural methyl donor antidotes. You can also see from the diagram below that

glutathione, our master antioxidant, can also be affected. People with low glutathione are more predisposed to disease – such as cancer (Balendiran, Dabur, & Fraser, 2004).

Source:(Holford & Braly, 2012)

During my research, I discovered that intermittent fasting also lowers homocysteine, as well as other inflammatory factors like c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and more (Aksungar, Topkaya, & Akyildiz, 2007; Fehime Aksungar, 2005). It also stimulates stem cell regeneration and improves immune function (Cheng et al., 2014).

It has been reported that as much as 40 percent of the population have a MTHFR mutation, but most people don’t know it. Is such a statistic behind the high rates of disease, such as heart disease, Alzheimer’s and cancer? This begs the question: why don’t more doctors know about it? And why don’t they regularly test for it? My assumption is that there are no drug treatments to lower homocysteine or the inflammatory markers or IGF-1, which is associated with higher rates of cancer. Downregulation of the IGF‐1 leads to massive apoptosis of cancer cells (Baserga, Peruzzi, & Reiss, 2003). The resistance therefore may have more to do with loss of profits than healing of patients.

With all the disease prevention and reversal benefits, why wouldn’t someone want to regularly practice fasting?

Dry Fasting

About three years ago, I stumbled upon dry fasting. It was mentioned in one chapter in Quantum Eating by Tanya Zavasta, a Russian woman living in the USA. She mentioned Dr

Sergio Filonov, a Russian doctor who had been supervising dry fasting for over 20 years. He was also mentioned in another book on fasting, where the author had completed a PhD on the benefits of fasting for depression (Fredricks, 2012). Filonov had written a book on the dry fasting method (Filonov, 2008). I found an online Google poorly translated version of his book and read it several times until I understood the general gist of the method. During a semester break from study, I decided to attempt a long fast (my goal was 40 days) and include some days of dry fasting. I managed a total of 34 days, of which nine were dry (not continuous – 5+2+2). It was the best fast I had ever completed, and I experienced major improvements in several areas.

For example, I had a knee cartilage removed when I was 20 (from a football injury) and it had become badly arthritic. I had been told by an orthopaedic surgeon about 15 years earlier that I needed a knee replacement. After the long fast, however, I believed that I might never need a replacement. Other normal aging aches and pains also disappeared. My sexual function improved enormously too. My morning “woody” returned and was very strong. After a particularly stressful period a few years earlier, I had been diagnosed with hepatitis C. It also disappeared. Filonov had mentioned that he had witnessed some cases of cures in this area, confirming that dry fasting has an antiviral benefit. That is why I believe that dry fasting will lower Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase or nagalase (Gulisano et al., 2013). This enzyme is produced by cancers and viruses and blocks the function of GcMAF, which is the “Pacman” for eliminating toxins.

Gynaecological Problems and Dry Fasting

Not long after my personal dry fasting experience, I hosted a young woman backpacker from Argentina. She stayed with me for about three months while she was gaining work experience at a local university, prior to starting a PhD. After I provided her with the

information on dry fasting, she decided to give it a try for three days. It coincidentally happened to be just before her periods were due. Unbeknown to me, her monthly menses were usually painful experiences and were accompanied with bad migraine headaches, which required pharmaceutical pain killer drugs. This time, however, her periods passed without any pain whatsoever. She then continued the practice for about six months until she finally discovered that she no longer needed to fast to avoid the pains. She has remained pain-free ever since.

About two months ago, I read a post by a woman, a young pharmacist in Sydney, on a Facebook group on fasting. She said that she had endometriosis and fertility problems. She was trying to get pregnant. I responded to her post and told her that I had read in Filonov’s book that he had success with various gynaecological problems, including endometriosis and infertility. I also introduced her to the Argentinian woman who had fixed her period pains with dry fasting. The pharmacist then decided to start intermittent daily dry fasting. After a month she completed a 64 hour continuous stint. Her next period was then normal and she subsequently tested fertile. Thereafter she adopted an alternate day dry fasting protocol.

After two months since the pharmacist started her dry fasting experiment, she excitedly messaged me and said that she was pregnant. Her concurrent eczema had also cleared, and her lower back pains (from previous hip surgery) had also improved.

What is especially admirable in this woman’s experience, is that her husband and his family strongly disagreed with her fasting. But she still went ahead and did it in secret. How she managed to do that I don’t know, but I admire her courageous and determined spirit. It just demonstrates what is possible if you are determined to succeed.

References

Aksungar, F. B., Topkaya, A. E., & Akyildiz, M. (2007). Interleukin-6, C-reactive protein and biochemical parameters during prolonged intermittent fasting. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 51(1), 88-95.

Balendiran, G. K., Dabur, R., & Fraser, D. (2004). The role of glutathione in cancer. Cell Biochemistry and Function: Cellular biochemistry and its modulation by active agents or disease, 22(6), 343-352.

Baserga, R., Peruzzi, F., & Reiss, K. (2003). The IGF‐1 receptor in cancer biology. International journal of cancer, 107(6), 873-877.

Cheng, C.-W., Adams, G. B., Perin, L., Wei, M., Zhou, X., Lam, B. S., . . . Dorff, T. B. (2014). Prolonged fasting reduces IGF-1/PKA to promote hematopoietic-stem-cell-based regeneration and reverse immunosuppression. Cell stem cell, 14(6), 810-823.

Fehime Aksungar, A. E., Sengul Ure, Onder Teskin, Gursel Ates. (2005). Effects of intermittent fasting on serum lipid levels, coagulation status and plasma homocysteine levels. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 49(2), 77-82.

Filonov, S. I. (2008). Dry medical fasting – myths and reality. Barnaul, Russia: Univ Ltd. “Five Plus”.

Fredricks, R. (2012). Fasting: an exceptional human experience: AuthorHouse.

Gulisano, M., Pacini, S., Thyer, L., Morucci, G., Branca, J. J., Smith, R., . . . Noakes, D. (2013). Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in cancer patients are affected by Vitamin D binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor. Italian Journal of Anatomy and Embryology, 118(2), 104.

Holford, P., & Braly, J. (2012). The Homocysteine Solution: The fast new way to dramatically improve your health: Hachette UK.

 

John Walker Bio:

John Walker has had extensive experience with fasting since the early 1990’s. He read a book in 1992 that had a chapter on fasting, and he subsequently completed a 10-day water fast. It healed some early arthritis that was starting in his shoulders, and his sexual function noticeably improved – indicating that he had improved his insulin resistance and blood circulation. For the next 15 years, John continued experimenting with various fasting protocols, including a supervised 75-day juice fast in 1997. Thereafter, he also began attending different fasting and detoxification health retreats (35 in total).

At the age of 60, John decided to get off the “business treadmill” and return to study to formalise his passion in wellness and health science. That is where he discovered from research and a DNA test, that regular fasting had disease-prevention and longevity benefits. He progressively increased the length of his experiments during semester vacations. They graduated from 10-days to 21-days to 34-days – with the last long one experimenting with dry fasting and it led to his best healing outcomes. Since then, he has shared his experiences and provided fasting information to other people – who have then gone on to achieve their own amazing results. John is now considering a switch to completing a PhD about the benefits of dry fasting for a range of disease states, and for prevention.

Article written & submitted by John Walker