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Diabetes….Why we need to be concerned & what are the clues?

Diabetes….Why we need to be concerned & what are the clues?

Body fat percentage, not BMI, predicts diabetes risk

Too many people have & don’t know it. Here’s why we need to do a better job at diagnosing it earlier.

Body mass index (BMI) is a traditional measurement that divides a person’s weight by their height to find out whether they have a healthy weight.

However, increasing amounts of studies have been questioning its usefulness and accuracy as an indicator of cardiometabolic health.

The distribution of fat, rather than the total amount, these studies suggest, may give us more clues about the risk of conditions such as insulin resistance, high blood pressure, heart disease, and even cancer.

 

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321567.php

How does Caffeine affect our health?

Many of us rely on a morning cup of coffee or a jolt of caffeine in the afternoon to help us get through the day. Caffeine is so widely available that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), says about 80 percent of U.S. adults take some form of caffeine every day. But caffeine does so much more than just keeping you awake. It’s a central nervous system stimulant that affects your body in numerous ways.

Knowing the symptoms of caffeine and its long-term effects on your body may make you think twice about having that fourth cup of coffee. Read on to learn more about these effects.

Caffeine provides no nutritional value on its own. It’s tasteless, so you won’t necessarily know if it’s in your food either. Even some medications may contain caffeine without your knowledge.

This ingredient almost always causes some symptoms. At a minimum, you may feel more energetic, but over time, too much caffeine may cause withdrawal symptoms. According to the Mayo Clinic, it’s safe for most healthy adults to consume up to 400 milligrams of caffeine per day. Keep in mind that a standard size cup of coffee is eight ounces. If you’re using a mug or getting your fix at a coffee house, chances are you’re drinking 16 ounces or more, so reading labels is important.

As you consume the same amount of caffeine on a daily basis, your body develops a tolerance to it. Other factors like your age, body mass, and overall health can determine your tolerance to caffeine, too. If you want to decrease the amount of caffeine you take, it’s best to decrease your consumption slowly.

According to the Mayo Clinic, you should limit caffeine consumption between 200 and 300 milligrams per day if you’re trying to get pregnant. There’s some evidence that large amounts of caffeine can interfere with the estrogen production and metabolism needed to conceive.

https://www.healthline.com/health/caffeine-effects-on-body#7

Simple ways to get started with a yoga routine & why it’s important

As part of a healthy lifestyle, yoga may lower cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar, according to Harvard Health Publications.

Improved Brain Function.
Just 20 minutes of Hatha yoga — an ancient form of the practice that emphasizes physical postures rather than flow or sequences — can improve cognitive function, boosting focus and working memory. In a University of Illinois study, participants performed significantly better on tests of brain functioning after yoga, as compared to their performance after 20 minutes of vigorous aerobic exercise.

Lower Stress Levels.
Yoga’s stress-busting powers may come from its ability to lessen the activity of proteins that are known to play a role in inflammation, according to a study published last year from University of California, Los Angeles researchers.

Increased Flexibility.
A recent Colorado State University study found that Bikram yoga — a form of yoga in which a series of 26 postures are performed for 90 minutes in a heated room — is linked with increased shoulder, lower back and hamstring flexibility, as well as greater deadlift strength and decreased body fat, compared with a control group.

 

 

After A Few Months.

Lower Blood Pressure.
People with mild to moderate hypertension might benefit from a yoga practice, as a study from University of Pennsylvania researchers found that it could help to lower their blood pressure levels. Researchers found that people who practiced yoga had greater drops in blood pressure compared with those who participated in a walking/nutrition/weight counseling program.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/28/body-on-yoga_n_4109595.html

New findings may explain the advantages of polyunsaturated fat

Written by Coach Connie,

Lifestyle Health Mentor

 

When we think of the word “fat”- We remember back to our parents and grandparents using lard for everything they made or putting a huge slab of butter on bread. Back then, we didn’t think anything of it when we were eating fat, whether it was good or bad for us. We just thought it was part of our diet.

Today, no matter where you look – you see news reports saying eat this fat but don’t eat this fat. We’re always trying to find the lowest fat diet. It almost seems as if we all need to be scientists just to figure out what should we eat. So let’s take a look at what polyunsaturated fat is, why it’s good for us and what should we consume to achieve the full benefits.

So, what is polyunsaturated fat and how does it affect our health? It is found in animal and plant foods, which is known as one of the healthier fats, together with monounsaturated fat. The biggest thing to remember is that we want to add in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat, which will be replacing saturated fats, commonly found in red meat, butter, cheese, and ice cream; and trans fat, which are unhealthy fats found in partially hydrogenated oil, that could increase health problems such as risk for heart disease. When you reduce the red meat and butter intake, substitute them with fish, beans, nuts, and healthy oils rather than refined carbohydrates. That’s why adding polyunsaturated fats into your diet can help lower your bad cholesterol (LDL), which causes your arteries to become blocked or clogged. It can contribute vitamin E to your diet, which is an antioxidant. By adding more of this healthier fat into our diets, it can boost your overall body, mind and soul, along with your waistline. Now isn’t that a bonus.

This type of fat includes omega-3 and omega-6 fats (EFA’s), which are essential fatty acids that helps our brain function and cell growth. We need to supplement these EFA’s through our food, since our body does not produce this on its own. They protect our heart because they contain EPA and DHA. They lower the risk of fatal heart attacks and sudden cardiac death caused by electrical problems that occur in the heart. By consuming fish, it may reduce the risk of stroke too and keep in mind, it contains vitamin D, healthy proteins, selenium, and other nutrients. It is recommended that you consume at least two 3-4oz servings of fish and seafood, including one serving of oily or dark meat fish per week. As for vegetable oils, it is recommended that you consume 5-6 teaspoons per day, which includes oil found in foods.

Lately, all you hear about is coconut oil or palm oils. Are they really better for you? Well, according to the AHA, there is no real known evidence as of now so, they recommend to stick to vegetable oils, because of the overwhelming evidence they are good for the heart.

So, how does the omega-3 and omega-6 fats work to our benefit?

  1. Lower triglycerides and lowers the risk of having an irregular heartbeat, known as arrhythmia.
  2. Cuts down the buildup of plaque in our arteries and decreasing our blood pressure
  3. It can regulate our blood sugar and lower our diabetes risk
  4. Lower inflammation and contains beneficial phytochemicals from the oil seeds

There are several foods that are recommended as part of the polyunsaturated fat category:

  1. Fish, including salmon, herring, trout, albacore tuna, anchovy, sardines, bluefish, mussels, halibut, bass, oysters and mackerel
  2. Vegetable, Safflower, Corn, Flax, Olive, Canola and Soybean oil
  3. Sunflower, poppy, chia and flax seeds
  4. Eggs and avocado
  5. Walnuts, soybeans, almonds, pine and brazil nuts
  6. Fresh, raw pork sausage, pork, roasted turkey, roasted chicken wings and duck
  7. Quinoa, toasted wheat germ, raw oat bran, dry chickpeas, millet, tahini and firm tofu

So, what if you don’t care for fish or have a fish allergy? According to the American Heart Association, you may want to supplement with over the counter fish oil capsules. Keep in mind, they are not regulated by the FDA. Most capsules carry about 200-400 mg of EPA plus DHA, which should be sufficient for most people. As always, consult with your doctor on a higher dose requirement. Some capsules leave an aftertaste or cause burping, so it’s best to choose the burp free option when choosing the right fish oil capsule.

Please note: As I always say, all in moderation, because eating too much of this type of fat can lead to weight gain, which contains 9 calories per gram. Carbohydrates and proteins carry half of that amount of calories, so just be aware of your consumption amount.

So, how does this compare to my daily healthy plate regimen? It is recommended to allow no more than 25%-30% of fat in your daily calories, of which should be from the polyunsaturated and monounsaturated groups. Keep in mind, limit the other fats, such as saturated fat to less than 6% of your daily calories.

Should we really have to read every label to see what type fat is in the product? Yes, because as stated, there are good and bad fats, so by knowing what to look for when purchasing the product will only benefit your health in the long run. Of course, keep in mind, that when food manufacturers lower fat, they usually substitute it with carbohydrates from sugar, refined grains, or other starches. These are digested faster in our bodies, which affects our insulin and blood sugar levels. This can result in weight gain and diseases.

As always, consult your health professional on any health concerns or questions.

I hope this article finds you in good health.

Sources:

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000747.htm

https://healthyforgood.heart.org/Eat-smart/Articles/Polyunsaturated-Fats

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/healthy-eating/choosing-healthy-fats.htm

http://www.anneshealthykitchen.com/top-30-foods-high-in-polyunsaturated-fat/

https://www.heartfoundation.org.au/healthy-eating/food-and-nutrition/fats-and-cholesterol/monounsaturated-and-polyunsaturated-omega-3-and-omega-6-fats

Baby Food Guidelines

When can your baby start eating solid foods? What about meat? Pediatricians answer all your baby food Qs. This guide gives you all the information you need to know on what to feed your little one(s)!

We can all agree that gauging when to start a baby’s first solid foods can be stressful, but Fisher reminds new parents to focus on the signs of readiness as a top priority instead of focusing solely on age. In her practice, she’s seen some babies who are ready for their first taste at 4 months, while others do better with solids at 6 months of age.

You can consider it a win once your baby has successfully kept down 2 to 3 tablespoons of food. Transitioning a baby from liquids to solids can take some time, Curtiss advises. “The first few times a baby is offered solids, she may spit it out, get it all over and not really know what to do with it. I generally recommend that parents take it slow and just have fun with it.”

 

 

http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/1074684/baby-food-guide

If your child meets the criteria listed by Curtiss and Fisher above and has the approval of their pediatrician, you can move along to the next stage of feeding. “Usually, the first food to be introduced is a single grain cereal, such as rice, mixed with breast milk until it is the consistency of pudding and fed on the spoon,” Curtiss explains. But you can also start with a vegetable such as sweet potato or avocado. Fruits are also a popular choice for little babes developing their taste buds for the first time — and they’re easy to mash.

Remember: The most important thing before starting solids is getting your pediatrician’s approval. Both articles breakdown age groups and recommended foods.

http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/1074684/baby-food-guide/page:2