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Who says “There’s no such thing as a quick workout”

Who says “There’s no such thing as a quick workout”

Compound Exercises Will Burn More Calories And Increase Muscle Tone
 
Here are some conventional exercises and a compound alternative that will make your workout much more effective…
The main difference between the old exercises and the new is the amount of muscles being activated at one time.  Sure, running is great exercise, and your working your heart, lungs, and legs.  But if you replace running with a high knee jog, while moving your arms back and forth, you’ll find its just as much cardio as running, but with much more muscle activation throughout your legs and especially abs.
http://www.thefitandtone.com/quick-workouts-lose-weight-fast.html

Superfood Trends to Watch

…and just what is a “superfood” anyway?

Who wouldn’t want to believe in the concept of “superfoods”? The idea that the vast expanse of nature has secret nutritional resources that can easily help us with a number of ailments if only they can be discovered and harvested, is definitely enticing.

It certainly seems like we’ve just been blind to treasure troves of exotic berries, nuts, and grains when these popular superfoods were unknown to the West until now. Açaí berries, for example, only gained fame outside of Brazil within the last decade.

It’s often their otherness that makes these foods so appealing. Quinoa, particularly popular among vegetarians and vegans, does indeed provide a decent protein source – but then again, so do many common beans and nut varieties.

Açaí berries and goji berries are packed with phytochemicals, a plant compound which does seem to have a positive effect on a person’s chances of heart disease and brain deterioration. That sounds fancy, except regular old blueberries and strawberries have lots of phytochemicals too.

 

 

https://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/the-truths-you-didnt-know-about-superfood.html

LHM Coach Facebook Page

 

Stop the Negativity

Thinking negatively is second nature to a lot of people.

We often do it and don’t even realize we are doing so. But has it gotten to the point where others have criticized you for being negative?

Learn how to stop being negative and how to be less critical of others by building the 37 habits to stop negativity forever. #infographic #change #wellness #mindfulness #happiness #stress #mindset #selfimprovement #habits

Negative thoughts make you feel unpleasant. It certainly takes some practice to stop negativity and start having a positive outlook on life.

But if you are able to change your perspective on things, you will be able to live a more fulfilling and purposeful life. Start with the steps mentioned in this article and see what changes they make in your overall well-being.

LHM Coach Facebook Page

https://www.developgoodhabits.com/how-to-stop-being-negative/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=pinterest&utm_campaign=tailwind_tribes&utm_content=tribes&utm_term=359510800_11454068_424298

7 Tips for Surviving Joint Pain While Traveling

The worst thing we can do to ourselves before vacation is get crammed in our seat on a flight for hours or driving in a car with no room to move. I’ve been there, but it comes at a cost. We end up having that unwanted joint pain and aches that won’t budge and you end up being irritable. It leads to unnecessary anxiety and stress. Plus the other members traveling aren’t having any fun hanging around you right now. Keep in mind, it’s even harder to tolerate joint pain and achiness in colder climates. That’s why you want to keep your joints limber with the following key factors.

Here are some techniques to helping you relax and enjoy the ride:

Hacks to Help You Relax & Enjoy The Ride!

  1. Get comfortable- Ask for a pillow or bring a back roll. Get up periodically and walk around the cabin, or train. Make vehicle stops to get up and move around plus if you’re maintaining your hydration levels, you’re stopping frequently for bathroom breaks. Especially pertinent to those with arthritis. Adjust your seat to have some room to let your legs stretch, which will provide some relief in such a crammed area. Choose an aisle seat to gain that extra flexibility to get up versus being a bothersome to others in the row. If you are suffering from a knee pain condition, you might want to choose an aisle bulkhead seat, which provides additional leg room. Plus booking connecting flights will aid in the additional activity that your joints need to keep them from stiffening up.
  2. Driving to the destination- If you don’t mind the long car trip, opt for driving instead of flying to give you some relief on your joints. You have more flexibility in your seat options. Plus if you have another driver who can take turns – it can alleviate the pressure of staying in the same position and you are able to move the seat all the way back. Keep in mind, there’s always cruise control and therefore less bending at your knee. Considering a brace might be beneficial to compensate for the injured ligaments and provide relief.
  3. Physical Activity- Provide the extra stability in building your quadriceps muscles with strength training. Of course, it doesn’t happen overnight, so you would want to encorporate a routine several months in advance.
  4. Carry along enough medication- So you are prepared for the entire trip and place extra in another bag, in the event of lost luggage.
  5. Medical Condition- If you have been diagnosed with a medical condition, update the airline prior to your trip to accommodate you with providing you a wheelchair and early boarding. Also airline personnel is there to help you carry your luggage or assist with the overhead bin, if needed.
  6. Booking a flight- Ask about getting one with less passengers to give you additional flexibility. Considering you most likely have the achy joints in the morning, you will want to consider a later am or afternoon flight.
  7. Heat or Ice- Bring along whichever option works for you on your flight or car ride to give you some extra relief. Use heat wraps or bring a reseal able bag as the flight attendant can provide you with the ice.
Preparation is key to any successful trip – stay active whether it’s walking or swimming, while maintaining appropriate stretches to keep your joints limber and ready for the next trip. Maintaining a healthy diet, including dairy, fruits, grains, and vegetables can provide antioxidant benefits. Encorporate foods with that provide you nutrients such as oranges, cabbage, spinach, and tomatoes. This will support the creation of cartilage and by ensuring you have the essential amount of milk daily will provide you the additional support of calcium to increase strength in your joints. Always make sure you are hydrated and eliminate processed foods and sugars as the inflammation spreads in the body. You should supplement with Omega 3 fatty acids, such as fish or walnuts. Ensure you are getting the 6-8 hours of sleep to help reduce fatigue, and stiffness in your joints.

Simple adjustments can make any trip worthwhile and easier to enjoy when you don’t have lingering pain taunting you. It also provides you with less pain in the future as the ligaments are getting adjusted to strength exercises and a well-balanced diet. It can only to your longevity and quality of life.I hope this article finds you in good health!
Sources:
https://www.everydayhealth.com
https://www.arthritis-health.com
http://www.athletico.com

About the Author

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Connie Stoltz-McDonald is an Integrative Nutrition-Certified Health Coach, CPT, Wellness Educator, and Blogger, whose passion for living a healthy lifestyle has become her mission through helping others achieve a balanced life. From her passion for writing, she is excited to announce her first book release titled “Healthy Lifestyle- The inside secrets to transforming your body and health.” If you’d like to get a copy, you can connect with her at
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An endometriosis and infertility success with dry fasting

Background:

In 2012, at the age of 61 and after a career in self-employment in many different industries, I decided to go back to university and study for a post-graduate wellness degree. My interest in complementary medicine began in the early 1990’s – via a relationship. In 2011, I had been stimulated by an article about a man completing his fourth degree, a Masters in Clinical Science – at the age of 97! My rationale about returning to study was that I still had more than 35 years to go before reaching my late 90’s; provided I could stay alive and healthy that long.

My last study was in the mid-1980’s for an MBA. My first degree was in accounting and finance in the 1970’s. I was a bit rusty when I commenced the wellness degree, and the technologies had changed, enabling me to study online. But I quickly adapted and enjoyed the research component.

Methylenetetrahydofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation

Early in 2012, I also had a nutrigenomics DNA test, and discovered that I have a MTHFR mutation which predisposes me to high homocysteine. This in-turn predisposes me to cardiovascular disease, depression, Alzheimer’s, cancer and more (Holford & Braly, 2012). For females, a MTHFR mutation can have serious effects on fertility.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcjSs6Abr1Y

The B vitamins, especially activated forms of folate and B12 and trimethylglicine (TMG), are the natural methyl donor antidotes. You can also see from the diagram below that

glutathione, our master antioxidant, can also be affected. People with low glutathione are more predisposed to disease – such as cancer (Balendiran, Dabur, & Fraser, 2004).

Source:(Holford & Braly, 2012)

During my research, I discovered that intermittent fasting also lowers homocysteine, as well as other inflammatory factors like c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and more (Aksungar, Topkaya, & Akyildiz, 2007; Fehime Aksungar, 2005). It also stimulates stem cell regeneration and improves immune function (Cheng et al., 2014).

It has been reported that as much as 40 percent of the population have a MTHFR mutation, but most people don’t know it. Is such a statistic behind the high rates of disease, such as heart disease, Alzheimer’s and cancer? This begs the question: why don’t more doctors know about it? And why don’t they regularly test for it? My assumption is that there are no drug treatments to lower homocysteine or the inflammatory markers or IGF-1, which is associated with higher rates of cancer. Downregulation of the IGF‐1 leads to massive apoptosis of cancer cells (Baserga, Peruzzi, & Reiss, 2003). The resistance therefore may have more to do with loss of profits than healing of patients.

With all the disease prevention and reversal benefits, why wouldn’t someone want to regularly practice fasting?

Dry Fasting

About three years ago, I stumbled upon dry fasting. It was mentioned in one chapter in Quantum Eating by Tanya Zavasta, a Russian woman living in the USA. She mentioned Dr

Sergio Filonov, a Russian doctor who had been supervising dry fasting for over 20 years. He was also mentioned in another book on fasting, where the author had completed a PhD on the benefits of fasting for depression (Fredricks, 2012). Filonov had written a book on the dry fasting method (Filonov, 2008). I found an online Google poorly translated version of his book and read it several times until I understood the general gist of the method. During a semester break from study, I decided to attempt a long fast (my goal was 40 days) and include some days of dry fasting. I managed a total of 34 days, of which nine were dry (not continuous – 5+2+2). It was the best fast I had ever completed, and I experienced major improvements in several areas.

For example, I had a knee cartilage removed when I was 20 (from a football injury) and it had become badly arthritic. I had been told by an orthopaedic surgeon about 15 years earlier that I needed a knee replacement. After the long fast, however, I believed that I might never need a replacement. Other normal aging aches and pains also disappeared. My sexual function improved enormously too. My morning “woody” returned and was very strong. After a particularly stressful period a few years earlier, I had been diagnosed with hepatitis C. It also disappeared. Filonov had mentioned that he had witnessed some cases of cures in this area, confirming that dry fasting has an antiviral benefit. That is why I believe that dry fasting will lower Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase or nagalase (Gulisano et al., 2013). This enzyme is produced by cancers and viruses and blocks the function of GcMAF, which is the “Pacman” for eliminating toxins.

Gynaecological Problems and Dry Fasting

Not long after my personal dry fasting experience, I hosted a young woman backpacker from Argentina. She stayed with me for about three months while she was gaining work experience at a local university, prior to starting a PhD. After I provided her with the

information on dry fasting, she decided to give it a try for three days. It coincidentally happened to be just before her periods were due. Unbeknown to me, her monthly menses were usually painful experiences and were accompanied with bad migraine headaches, which required pharmaceutical pain killer drugs. This time, however, her periods passed without any pain whatsoever. She then continued the practice for about six months until she finally discovered that she no longer needed to fast to avoid the pains. She has remained pain-free ever since.

About two months ago, I read a post by a woman, a young pharmacist in Sydney, on a Facebook group on fasting. She said that she had endometriosis and fertility problems. She was trying to get pregnant. I responded to her post and told her that I had read in Filonov’s book that he had success with various gynaecological problems, including endometriosis and infertility. I also introduced her to the Argentinian woman who had fixed her period pains with dry fasting. The pharmacist then decided to start intermittent daily dry fasting. After a month she completed a 64 hour continuous stint. Her next period was then normal and she subsequently tested fertile. Thereafter she adopted an alternate day dry fasting protocol.

After two months since the pharmacist started her dry fasting experiment, she excitedly messaged me and said that she was pregnant. Her concurrent eczema had also cleared, and her lower back pains (from previous hip surgery) had also improved.

What is especially admirable in this woman’s experience, is that her husband and his family strongly disagreed with her fasting. But she still went ahead and did it in secret. How she managed to do that I don’t know, but I admire her courageous and determined spirit. It just demonstrates what is possible if you are determined to succeed.

References

Aksungar, F. B., Topkaya, A. E., & Akyildiz, M. (2007). Interleukin-6, C-reactive protein and biochemical parameters during prolonged intermittent fasting. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 51(1), 88-95.

Balendiran, G. K., Dabur, R., & Fraser, D. (2004). The role of glutathione in cancer. Cell Biochemistry and Function: Cellular biochemistry and its modulation by active agents or disease, 22(6), 343-352.

Baserga, R., Peruzzi, F., & Reiss, K. (2003). The IGF‐1 receptor in cancer biology. International journal of cancer, 107(6), 873-877.

Cheng, C.-W., Adams, G. B., Perin, L., Wei, M., Zhou, X., Lam, B. S., . . . Dorff, T. B. (2014). Prolonged fasting reduces IGF-1/PKA to promote hematopoietic-stem-cell-based regeneration and reverse immunosuppression. Cell stem cell, 14(6), 810-823.

Fehime Aksungar, A. E., Sengul Ure, Onder Teskin, Gursel Ates. (2005). Effects of intermittent fasting on serum lipid levels, coagulation status and plasma homocysteine levels. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 49(2), 77-82.

Filonov, S. I. (2008). Dry medical fasting – myths and reality. Barnaul, Russia: Univ Ltd. “Five Plus”.

Fredricks, R. (2012). Fasting: an exceptional human experience: AuthorHouse.

Gulisano, M., Pacini, S., Thyer, L., Morucci, G., Branca, J. J., Smith, R., . . . Noakes, D. (2013). Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase levels in cancer patients are affected by Vitamin D binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor. Italian Journal of Anatomy and Embryology, 118(2), 104.

Holford, P., & Braly, J. (2012). The Homocysteine Solution: The fast new way to dramatically improve your health: Hachette UK.

 

John Walker Bio:

John Walker has had extensive experience with fasting since the early 1990’s. He read a book in 1992 that had a chapter on fasting, and he subsequently completed a 10-day water fast. It healed some early arthritis that was starting in his shoulders, and his sexual function noticeably improved – indicating that he had improved his insulin resistance and blood circulation. For the next 15 years, John continued experimenting with various fasting protocols, including a supervised 75-day juice fast in 1997. Thereafter, he also began attending different fasting and detoxification health retreats (35 in total).

At the age of 60, John decided to get off the “business treadmill” and return to study to formalise his passion in wellness and health science. That is where he discovered from research and a DNA test, that regular fasting had disease-prevention and longevity benefits. He progressively increased the length of his experiments during semester vacations. They graduated from 10-days to 21-days to 34-days – with the last long one experimenting with dry fasting and it led to his best healing outcomes. Since then, he has shared his experiences and provided fasting information to other people – who have then gone on to achieve their own amazing results. John is now considering a switch to completing a PhD about the benefits of dry fasting for a range of disease states, and for prevention.

Article written & submitted by John Walker