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Tackling Vitamin Deficiency

A healthy diet can provide all a growing body needs, but the reality of our busy lifestyles and sometimes finicky eating habits can lead to vitamin deficiency. Knowing what to look for is part of the battle. In this article we’ll try to help you detect nutritional deficiencies. Also note that symptoms are actually better indicators of nutritional deficiency than signs (In medicine a sign is objective while a symptom is subjective).

 

 

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http://positivemed.com/2013/05/20/detecting-nutritional-deficiencies/

Everything you need to know to ensure a good night’s sleep

Around 40% of American adults don’t get a full seven hours of sleep per night, according to a 2013 Gallup poll. An estimated 50 to 70 million adults in the United States have chronic sleeping disorders. And about 40% of adults in the United States report falling asleep by accident during the day at least once a month, according to the NIH.

Want some help with that?

 

https://www.buzzfeed.com/carolynkylstra/how-many-hours-of-sleep-should-you-get?utm_term=.um2xlO6eR#.ui4Ky4ZAj

 

How do you break free from “Sugar”?

Let’s talk ways to decrease sugar cravings! Because eliminating sugar from your diet is one of the simplest and quickest ways to improve overall health.

Any time you eliminate sugar from your diet, whether just getting rid of processed sugar, switching to clean eating or going full on paleo, you’re going to start craving it. Even though it’s terrible for you, you’re body is used to all those refined simple carbs; your taste buds are accustomed to sweet flavors and your emotions are all wrapped in sweet things making you happy.

It’s a hard cycle to break.

The good news is that it doesn’t last long. If you’re committed and make it through the first few days, those cravings will diminish and then vanish altogether. It gets a lot easier to eat healthy if you stick to it.

And it doesn’t all have to be tortuous deprivation. Even if you’re eliminating all simple carbs, not just processed sugar, these tricks can satisfy your body, your taste buds and your emotions. You’ll be clear of the cravings before you know it.

 

http://bellesavvy.com/decrease-sugar-cravings/

Anti-Inflammatory Foods & Benefits

Try to eat as much alkaline forming foods as you can to help loosen the joints, fill your plate with anti-inflammatory foods and steer clear of the archenemies (sugar, shade veggies, processed foods, etc). It doesn’t always work for everyone but it definitely provides relief for me.

A quick breakdown of these foods and why they’re great to help inflammation:

Flaxseed: Has omega-3 fatty acid which helps inflammation.

Green tea: Contains anti-inflammatory polyphenols.

Turmeric: High anti-inflammatory properties due to its curcumin content.

Cantaloupe: Has anti-inflammatory phytonutrients.

Avocado and walnuts: Contain anti-inflammatory fatty acids.

Lemon: Has anti-oxident and anti-inflammatory vitamin C.

Berries and Cherries: Contain anti-inflammatory phytochemicals.

Pineapple: High in anti-inflammatory bromelain.

Kale: Has 45 anti-oxident and anti-inflammatory flavonoids.

Garlic: Has high anti-inflammatory sulfer-containing compounds.

Broccoli: Contains anti-inflammatory and anti-oxident phytonutrients.

https://www.yogabycandace.com/blog/2013/6/11/anti-inflammatory-foods

What is the “Zone” Diet and is there a comparison to the “Mediterranean” Diet?

Written by Coach Connie,

Lifestyle Health Mentor

 

Did you know there are over 100 dietary theories out there and that’s just the ones that have been referenced or documented? When we look back on our ancestor’s daily meal habits, we most likely seen meat, potatoes, vegetables and occasionally the dessert daunting us to have a piece. There are so many ways to get our nutrients and diets are the focus of society’s outtake on living healthy.

So what is the right “diet”?  There’s a reason there are so many “diets” in reach, but what does each do and how do we know what works and doesn’t. As someone who has been in the health industry for years, I’ve been there. I felt like I was my own test subject to figuring my body out. That’s why no diet works for everyone, we all are different, but knowing what we can have and what our body needs is half the battle.

I started with the “Zone Diet” and then switched to the “Mediterranean Diet” due to changes in my exercise routine and metabolic changes. Once I achieved my goal weight, I wanted to ensure that I would recover more rapidly from exercise by controlling my levels of inflammation, and doing this in a way that allows me to perform at my highest possible level.

Dr. Barry Sears wrote the book on the “Zone Diet” and then almost 20 years later, wrote the book titled, “The Mediterranean Zone”.  It has very similar attributes, but unlike the Mediterranean diet, the Zone Diet shifts on view on the healthy eating plate. The Zone diet contains 40% of the calories as carbohydrates, 30% of the calories as protein, and 30% of the calories as fat. This improved protein-to-carbohydrate balance means decreased insulin levels and decreased cellular inflammation. A Mediterranean diet shifts the carbohydrates to 50%, protein goes down to 20% and the fat remains at 30%. That’s why it’s been highly recommended for weight loss and cardiovascular health.  Technically, they both have benefits that tie together. Again, depending on our inflammation and metabolic factors and how it affects our insulin responses.

To ensure the best results, time out your meals to help stabilize blood sugar levels and add in physical activity at least three days per week.

An example of a daily meal plan:

  • 7am: breakfast (should be eaten within 1 hour of waking)
  • 12pm: lunch (eaten no more than 5 hours later)
  • 5pm: a mid-afternoon snack
  • 7pm: dinner (2-3 hours after snack)
  • 11pm: a late night snack right before bed to balance blood sugar levels in the brain while sleeping

The Zone Diet states that a 1/3 of the plate (about 3oz for women and 4oz for men) should be made up of protein, and the remaining 2/3 should be fruits and vegetables – with a dash of monounsaturated oil to finish off the meal.

So let’s clarify, what are the some examples of the right foods and ones to avoid and the pros & cons to the Zone Diet:

Foods to include:

  • Skinless chicken
  • Fish
  • Egg whites
  • Tofu
  • Legumes
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Olive oil
  • Almonds
  • Avocado
  • Turkey
  • Low-fat dairy
  • Soy meat substitutes

Foods to avoid:

  • Trans-fats
  • High sugar fruits and veggies like corn and bananas
  • Breads
  • Pasta
  • Rice
  • Fruit juices
  • Tortillas
  • Bagels

Pros:

  • Discourages the consumption of trans-fats
  • Promotes consistent eating habits
  • Recommends adequate intake of fruits and vegetables

Cons:

  • Zone products are processed
  • Excludes certain plant based foods

The Mediterranean diet consists of natural, whole foods such as whole grains, vegetables, fruits, meat, fish, nuts, dairy, and pure oils, and excludes processed and refined foods. The diet includes an abundance of extra virgin olive oil and seasonal fruits and vegetables as well as whole, unprocessed grains. It’s recommended that wine consumption remain at 1-2 small glasses daily, and coffee is consumed moderately for pleasure and mental stimulation.

Now let’s take a look at some of the examples of the right foods and ones to avoid and the pros & cons to the Mediterranean Diet:

Foods to include:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Whole grain
  • Fish
  • Meats
  • Dairy
  • Nuts
  • Olive oil

Foods to avoid:

  • Processed foods
  • Refined foods

Pros:

  • Moderate, flexible approach
  • Considers primary food
  • May become a sustainable lifestyle approach

Cons:

  • Some may require firmer guidelines to feel their best
  • Some may not react well to wine and coffee
  • Some may not have the willpower to moderate rich foods

 

To put things in perspective, the zone diet is the evolution of the Mediterranean diet. There is no “one–size fits all” diets, but reviewing both methods shows very comparable methods, but unique when comparing our overall dietary guidelines.

Find what works best for your body type and always consult your health professional. I hope this article finds you in good health.

 

Sources:

Get started with the Mediterranean Diet www.mediterraneandietforall.com

Mediterranean Diet www.health.usnews.com

Mediterranean Diet www.mediterraneandiet.com

The Zone Diet. webmd.com. 6 February 2009

What is the Mediterranean Diet and The Zone Diet? www.Zonediet.com? 21 March 2011

2017 Integrative Nutrition, Inc. Learning Center under Dietary Theories