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Handling Stress without putting on weight

Recent studies indicate that eating food is an easy way to suppress chronic stress and depression. Unfortunately, eating food to alleviate stress may lead to weight gain and health issues in the long-run. As long as you keep your stress eating under control, it may not affect your body as much. But, if external events such as a big change in your life cause you to experience chronic stress, your formerly benign stress-relief eating strategy could cost you your self-image, your shape, and even your health.

This Is How You Handle Stress Without Putting on Weight:

If you have experienced several big traumas or a series of small traumas, especially during childhood, your brain may have learned to overreact. If that is the case, the smallest perceived threat can produce an intense stress response.

The human brain has not evolved to handle modern society’s sources of stress. It knows survival instincts and the flight or fight response but has forgotten how to release it.

Before I started healing past traumas, I was in freeze mode most of the time. I would numb myself and feel nothing or I would feel extremely intense levels of stress despite the lack of major external stimuli. If you’re experiencing similar erratic surges of stress, I strongly advise you to contact a matrix reimprinting practitioner like myself and use all the techniques I’m going to mention below.

If your stress levels range from medium to low but with a few peaks during the day, you should be able to manage stress eating on your own with just this advice

Here are the simple strategies you can use.

Exercise 30 to 60 minutes three times a week:
Do some cardio-training, something that will make you sweat and move your body quickly. I like to jump on a rebounder or perform some fast-paced exercise. Your goal here should only be to enjoy yourself and relieve stress. Please make sure you’re fully present to what you’re doing and that you’re focusing on every movement you’re making. This will give you faster results and train your brain to concentrate on what it’s doing. This will be most helpful if you tend to have obsessive thoughts.

If you can’t exercise that often, try to practice brisk walking, use the stairs, and do 10-minute workouts daily instead.

Stop eating sugar:
Sugar will increase your anxiety levels by creating highs and lows. I have written a very thorough article on the subject. Read it at How to Stop Eating Sugar

Stop eating or drinking stress-triggering foods and beverages:
The first things that come to mind are coffee, tea, chocolate, colas, and other high-caffeine drinks. You can still use very dark chocolate to stop your cravings—if you’re not addicted to it, of course. I stopped drinking coffee when I stopped smoking. I was convinced that they were helping me get through the day but now, when I look back years later, I know they were only making me a nervous wreck.

There are several easy ways to stop stress eating from ruining your shape. The most obvious one is to keep your stress under control. However, you can go much further than that and find new ways to respond to life’s challenges and keep your weight down.

 

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How does Caffeine affect our health?

Many of us rely on a morning cup of coffee or a jolt of caffeine in the afternoon to help us get through the day. Caffeine is so widely available that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), says about 80 percent of U.S. adults take some form of caffeine every day. But caffeine does so much more than just keeping you awake. It’s a central nervous system stimulant that affects your body in numerous ways.

Knowing the symptoms of caffeine and its long-term effects on your body may make you think twice about having that fourth cup of coffee. Read on to learn more about these effects.

Caffeine provides no nutritional value on its own. It’s tasteless, so you won’t necessarily know if it’s in your food either. Even some medications may contain caffeine without your knowledge.

This ingredient almost always causes some symptoms. At a minimum, you may feel more energetic, but over time, too much caffeine may cause withdrawal symptoms. According to the Mayo Clinic, it’s safe for most healthy adults to consume up to 400 milligrams of caffeine per day. Keep in mind that a standard size cup of coffee is eight ounces. If you’re using a mug or getting your fix at a coffee house, chances are you’re drinking 16 ounces or more, so reading labels is important.

As you consume the same amount of caffeine on a daily basis, your body develops a tolerance to it. Other factors like your age, body mass, and overall health can determine your tolerance to caffeine, too. If you want to decrease the amount of caffeine you take, it’s best to decrease your consumption slowly.

According to the Mayo Clinic, you should limit caffeine consumption between 200 and 300 milligrams per day if you’re trying to get pregnant. There’s some evidence that large amounts of caffeine can interfere with the estrogen production and metabolism needed to conceive.

https://www.healthline.com/health/caffeine-effects-on-body#7

What are our children’s top worries by each age group?

Every developmental stage has their own common set of worries and fears. Here is a comprehensive list of common worries by age.

Having some fears during each developmental stage is normal. However, if your child is immobilized by fears or it is impeding their daily functioning – it would be a good idea to talk to your pediatrician or a child therapist.

If you need additional support with anxiety, take a parenting e-course to learn how to teach your child to crush anxiety. Taught by a child therapist, you will be given all the skills to help your child fight back.

 

Child Therapist’s List of Childhood Fears by Age

Managing Cravings

An important question to ask before eating – am I hungry?

Eating when stressed happens to all of us. It is a normal part of life, however if it happens too often, it can lead to even more stress and no one needs that!

One of the key elements that I use personally in my health coaching business is to use the following method to determine is it physical or emotional hunger and the steps to break it down. I’ve also included a great guide to all our favorite “bad” food cravings, which breakdown the why behind the craving and what “healthy” food we should reach for to help us conquer this battle.

 

 

 

 

7 Ways to Make No-Bake Energy Bites

Today, we’re diving deep into the world of energy bites, everyone’s favorite meal prep snack recipe!

Energy bites are a great healthier treat, packed with protein thanks to a nut butter base, chia seeds and ground flax. They are sweet enough that you feel like you just had a treat, and filling enough to keep you going when you’re on empty.

Not only that but they are so convenient to grab on your way out the door.

Swaps in this no bake energy bite recipe:

  • honey and maple syrup are interchangeable
  • natural nut butters are interchangeable, however non-natural nut butters are not recommended for this recipe (they don’t set properly and are overly sweet)
  • if you don’t have coconut oil, try an extra tablespoon of nut butter
  • if you can’t find ground flax, add 2 extra tablespoons of rolled oats

Storing your no-bake energy bites:

  • Short term: Store in a sealed container in the fridge.  Your energy bites are good for a week or so.
  • Long term: Store in plastic bags in the freezer.  Freeze on a cookie sheet for one hour before transferring to a ziplock plastic bag in the freezer.  *Remove as much air as possible before sealing the bag*
  • To thaw: place in the fridge overnight
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